African scammers on dating sites

They are then instructed to take the information learned, and then create the "perfect woman" for the target.

Adhrann says that scammers should "emphasize on you being in a difficult financial situation, yet DO NOT insist on that, but treat this subject like you have been much better in the past, and really ashamed now, [as you are] not used to being poor." Step three is where things start getting really interesting.

So how do you know if someone is trying to scam you?

Well, first of all, Adhrann suggests that readers look for certain types of men: "40-60, technical or financial formation (IT, analyst, accountant, consultant, engineer, etc); lonely, or still living with parents, poor social/conversational skills, shy, a bit weird, nerd type, etc." So if that sounds like you, stay alert.

This screenshot shows a user of a hacker forum being advised that a quick way to find sets of photos is to automatically download them from Facebook: Even before a scammer messages you, you can spot they're fake by checking their photos.

But there's a type of dating site scam that's far trickier to spot, and the people who operate it claim to be making thousands of dollars every month fooling vulnerable men.

If you've used a dating site or app like Ok Cupid or Tinder, you'll have noticed the hundreds of fake profiles that exist on the sites, seemingly designed to make you hand over your profile to scammers.

Dating sites are, thankfully, getting better at spotting who is using their service to send thousands of spam messages.

That's a sure sign that the account is fake, as the photo must have been circulating on the internet.

Step two in the dating scam guide deals with "developing a virtual relationship." Scammers are told to ask lots of questions about their targets, paying particular attention to their past relationships.

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